Current

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January 9 – February 28

 

Seven contemporary artists use color and abstraction to define space and structure.

Artists include Tom Berenz, Derrick Buisch, Ben Grant, Mark Ottens, Jeremy Popelka, Jason Rohlf and Richard Taylor.

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  • The paintings of Tom Berenz blur the lines between realism and abstraction and imaginatively discuss ideological and environmental issues with bold shapes formed by acrylic, oil and spray paint on canvas
  • Derrick Buisch’s decades long practice of maintaining sketchbooks with ideograms of ordinary objects has resulted in distinct images of graphic motifs culminating in a complex collection of individual object Monsters with striking surface tension
  • Ben Grant forms a visual syntax with strings of information made of color and pattern to build
    complex relationships within his paintings on panel
  • Mark Ottens continues to find new ways to express the outer limits of color and depth in his
    highly intricate, many layered, intimately sized paintings

Large Tapestry Bowl

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  • Jeremy Popelka blows vibrant, contemporary forms in glass using the ancient technique of Murrini. In the impressive body of work created for CHROMA, he explores new patterns inspired by ancient textiles and revisits Venetian favorites
  • Jason Rohlf incorporates elements of collage and drawing embedded in layers of paint and
    varnish in his rhythmic paintings. Blended marks and stratum form a warm palimpsest surface that is in harmony with his contemporary imagery
  • Richard Taylor’s dynamically painted aluminum sculptures integrate pop color and bold shapes to express his interest in poetry, travel and jazz

 
 



 

Mary Jones: New Work

February 14 – March 14

In the East Gallery

 
Focusing on the details of daily life and childhood memories, Mary Jones’ cartoon like figures have an insightful character with a serious edge influenced by the Chicago Imagists. Fanciful at first glance, further study reveals the more serious side of life through bold strokes of paint and subtle touches of collage.

Mary Jones